Yeungnam Univ J Med.  2019 May;36(2):105-108. 10.12701/yujm.2019.00108.

Impact of calcineurin inhibitors on rat glioma cells viability

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. mdjin922@gmail.com
  • 2Keimyung University Kidney Institute, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.
  • 3Department of Biochemistry, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Although kidney transplantation outcomes have improved dramatically after using calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), CNI toxicity continues to be reported and the mechanism remains uncertain. Here, we investigated the neurotoxicity of CNIs by focusing on the viability of glioma cells.
METHODS
Glioma cells were treated with several concentrations of CNIs for 24 hours at 37℃ and their cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay.
RESULTS
Exposure to 0, 0.25, 0.5, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mM concentrations respectively showed 100%, 64.3%, 61.3%, 68.1%, 62.4%, and 68.6% cell viability for cyclosporine and 100%, 38.6%, 40.8%, 43.7%, 37.8%, and 43.0% for tacrolimus. The direct toxic effect of tacrolimus on glioma cell viability was stronger than that of cyclosporine at the same concentration.
CONCLUSION
CNIs can cause neurological side effects by directly exerting cytotoxic effects on brain cells. Therefore, we should carefully monitor the neurologic symptoms and level of CNIs in kidney transplant patients.

Keyword

Calcineurin inhibitors; Glioma cell; Kidney transplantation; Neurotoxicity

MeSH Terms

Animals
Brain
Calcineurin Inhibitors*
Calcineurin*
Cell Survival
Cyclosporine
Glioma*
Humans
Kidney
Kidney Transplantation
Neurologic Manifestations
Rats*
Tacrolimus
Calcineurin
Calcineurin Inhibitors
Cyclosporine
Tacrolimus
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