J Bone Metab.  2017 Aug;24(3):141-145. 10.11005/jbm.2017.24.3.141.

Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research Task Force Report: Perspectives on Intermittent High-dose Vitamin D Supplementation

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
  • 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 3Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 4Department of Orthopaedics, Cheil General Hospital and Women's Healthcare Center, Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 5Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 6Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 7Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. okwendo@naver.com

Abstract

An adequate supply of vitamin D is considered necessary for osteoporosis management and fracture prevention. Intermittent high-dose vitamin D supplementation is an effective and convenient way to achieve and maintain sufficient vitamin D status. However, the long-term effectiveness of supplementation for preventing falls and fractures is unclear, and some deleterious effects of such treatments have been reported. Concerning these issues, the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research task force team reviewed previous clinical trials and provided the following perspectives based on current evidence: 1) An adequate supply of vitamin D is necessary for preventing falls and fractures in postmenopausal women and men older than 50 years. An oral intake of 800 to 1,000 IU/day of vitamin D is generally recommended. 2) Care should be taken concerning the routine use of intermittent high-dose vitamin D, as large-scale clinical trials showed increased risk of falls or fractures after high-dose vitamin D administration. Intermittent high-dose vitamin D supplementation is recommendable only in cases of malabsorption or when oral administration is not suitable. 3) Monitoring of the serum level of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25[OH]D) is advisable, especially when intermittent high-dose vitamin D is used for supplementation. The task force team suggests that a serum 25(OH)D level of >20 ng/mL is generally appropriate for the prevention of osteoporosis, and that a serum 25(OH)D level of >30 ng/mL is probably helpful both for the management of osteoporosis and the prevention of fractures and falls. However, serum 25(OH)D level >50 ng/mL (this value can vary depending on the measurement method used) is unnecessary and may be undesirable. These perspectives are relevant for the management of osteoporosis, falls, or fractures. Other metabolic bone diseases or non-skeletal disorders are not within the scope of these perspectives.

Keyword

Vitamin D; Osteoporosis; Fracture; Fall
Full Text Links
  • JBM
Actions
Cited
CITED
export Copy
Close
Share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
Similar articles
Copyright © 2021 by Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors. All rights reserved.     E-mail: koreamed@kamje.or.kr