Res Vestib Sci.  2017 Sep;16(3):92-96. 10.21790/rvs.2017.16.3.92.

A Case of Labyrinthitis Ossificans Presenting as an Intractable Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. kcw5088@dreamwiz.com

Abstract

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder. It is easily cured with canal repositioning maneuvers, but some patients are resistant to the repositioning maneuver and require surgical intervention. Labyrinthitis ossificans is the pathologic condition that fibrous tissue and new bone occupy the membranous labyrinthine space. It occurs as a sequela of inner ear inflammation resulting from diverse causes, mostly bacterial meningitis and otitis media. We describe here a 42-year-old female patient with refractory posterior semicircular canal (PSCC) BPPV and adhesive otitis media in same ear. Otoscopic examination revealed adhesive tympanic membrane without middle ear space and temporal bone computed tomography showed complete ossification of the labyrinth at the same side. We performed a canal wall down mastoidectomy and PSCC occlusion. The patient had complete resolution of paroxysmal vertigo and positional nystagmus, postoperatively.

Keyword

Labyrinthitis; Ossification; Sensorineural hearing loss; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

MeSH Terms

Adhesives
Adult
Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo*
Ear
Ear, Inner*
Ear, Middle
Female
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural
Humans
Inflammation
Labyrinthitis*
Meningitis, Bacterial
Nystagmus, Physiologic
Otitis Media
Semicircular Canals
Temporal Bone
Tympanic Membrane
Vertigo
Adhesives
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