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Direction-Changing and Direction-Fixed Positional Nystagmus in Patients With Vestibular Neuritis and Meniere Disease

Kim CH, Shin JE, Yoo MH, Park HJ

OBJECTIVES: Direction-changing positional nystagmus (PN) was considered to indicate the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo involving lateral semicircular canal in most cases. We investigated the incidence of PN on...
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Characteristics of Nystagmus during Attack of Vestibular Migraine

Yoon S, Kim MJ, Kim M

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to investigate characteristics of nystagmus during attacks of vestibular migraine (VM), and to find a distinct clinical feature compared to other migraine and...
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Outcome of Canalith Repositioning Procedure in Patients with Persistent and Transient Geotropic Direction-Changing Positional Nystagmus: Short-term Follow-up Evaluation

Jeon SS, Li SW, Kim SK, Kim YB, Park IS, Hong SM

OBJECTIVES: Patients, who showed persistent geotropic-direction changing positional nystagmus (p-DCPN) tend to have different clinical manifestations from those who showed transient geotropic DCPN (t-DCPN). We investigated the clinical characteristics between...
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Postprandial Dizziness/Syncope Relieved by Alfa-Glucosidase Inhibitor: A Case Report

An H, Jeong SH, Kim HJ, Sohn EH, Lee AY, Kim JM

A 74-year-old man presented with positional vertigo and prandial dizziness and syncope. He had experienced episodes of frequent dizziness and loss of consciousness for several months. He underwent total gastrectomy...
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Positional Vertigo Showing Direction-Changing Positional Nystagmus after Chronic Otitis Media Surgery: Is It Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?

Choi S, Shin JE, Kim CH

This case report describes a patient who developed positional vertigo after surgery for chronic otitis media on the right side. Canal wall up mastoidectomy was performed, and the stapes was...
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Abnormal Oculomotor Functions in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Kang BH, Kim JI, Lim YM, Kim KK

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although traditionally regarded as spared, a range of oculomotor dysfunction has been recognized in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. ALS is nowadays considered as a neurodegenerative disorder...
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The Light Cupula: An Emerging New Concept for Positional Vertigo

Kim MB, Hong SM, Choi H, Choi S, Pham NC, Shin JE, Kim CH

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common type of positional vertigo. A canalolithiasis-type of BPPV involving the lateral semicircular canal (LSCC) shows a characteristic direction-changing positional nystagmus (DCPN)...
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A Case of Labyrinthitis Ossificans Presenting as an Intractable Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Kim DH, Sung JM, Jung HK, Kim CW

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder. It is easily cured with canal repositioning maneuvers, but some patients are resistant to the repositioning maneuver and...
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Extremely Long Latency Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Abrahamsen ER, Hougaard D

Case history of a 67-year-old man diagnosed with posterior benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) with extremely long latencies after holding the Dix-Hallpike position for five minutes. Additional vestibular assessment indicated...
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Central Apogeotropic Direction Changing Positional Nystagmus due to Fourth Ventricle Mass Mimicking Horizontal Canal Cupulolithiasis Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Jeon HW, Shim YJ, Park MK, Suh MW

In some dizzy patients the apogeotropic direction changing positional nystagmus (DCPN) can be caused by a central disorder such as a mass lesion near the fourth ventricle or infaction. We...
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Isolated Cerebellar Nodular Infarction with Apogeotropic Central Paroxysmal Positional Nystagmus

Choi YC, Lee SJ

No abstract available.
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Positional Dizziness and Vertigo without Nystagmus and Orthostatic Hypotension

Park JH

According to the Barany Society classification of vestibular symptoms, positional dizziness or vertigo is defined as dizziness or vertigo triggered by and occurring after a change of head position in...
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Persistent Positional Vertigo in a Patient with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case Report

Kim YW, Shin JE, Lee YS, Kim CH

Because inner ear organs are interconnected through the endolymph and surrounding endolymphatic membrane, the patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) often complain of vertigo. In this study, we report...
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Clinical Analysis of Positional Vertigo without Nystagmus at Initial Examinations

Lee KH, Park J, Lee HM, Ryu SH, Park SK, Chang J

OBJECTIVE: Patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) visit clinics with typical position evoked vertigo. However, typical nystagmus are concealed according to many factors We evaluated the demographic, clinical and...
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Two Cases of Barotraumatic Perilymph Fistula Mimicking Atypical Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Sudden Hearing Loss

Lee JJ, Ryu G, Moon IJ, Chung WH

Barotraumatic perilymph fistula is difficult to diagnose and needs diagnosis of suspicion. Symptoms like hearing loss, tinnitus, ear fullness and positional dizziness can develop following barotrauma such as valsalva, nose...
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Delayed Positional Vertigo after Stapes Surgery

Park JW, Lee JH, Song MH, Shim DB

Postoperative vertigo can occur after stapes surgery in approximately 5% of the patients, which more commonly presents immediately after surgery rather than in the delayed period. Isolated delayed vertigo after...
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Clinical Characteristics of Horizontal Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Persistent Geotropic Direction Changing Positional Nystagmus

Ko KM, Song MH, Park JW, Lee JH, Shin YG, Shim DB

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical characteristics of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (h-BPPV) with persistent geotropic direction changing positional nystagmus (DCPN). METHODS: One hundred...
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Persistent Direction-Fixed Nystagmus Following Canalith Repositioning Maneuver for Horizontal Canal BPPV: A Case of Canalith Jam

Chang YS, Choi J, Chung WH

  • KMID: 2278389
  • Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol.
  • 2014 Jun;7(2):138-141.
The authors report a 64-year-old man who developed persistent direction fixed nystagmus after a canalith repositioning maneuver for horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV). The patient was initially diagnosed...
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Two Cases of Central Vertigo Presenting as Apogeotropic Direction Changing Positional Nystagmus

Park MC, Park JS, Kim MB, Ban JH

  • KMID: 1910486
  • Res Vestib Sci.
  • 2014 Jun;13(2):57-62.
Positional vertigo and nystagmus without focal neurological symptoms and signs are characteristic features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). And the apogeotropic positional nystagmus can be diagnosed as cupulolithiasis of...
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Anatomy and Physiology of Balance

Im S

Postural balance is controlled by intricate connections between the vestibular, visual and proprioception system. Among these, the vestibular system is one of the key factors in coordinating and maintaining balance....
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