Arch Plast Surg.  2014 May;41(3):241-247. 10.5999/aps.2014.41.3.241.

Effects of the Diabetic Condition on Grafted Fat Survival: An Experimental Study Using Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Plastic Surgery, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Korea.
  • 3Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Ewha Womans University Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. srps@ewha.ac.kr

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Autologous fat grafts have been widely used for cosmetic purposes and for soft tissue contour reconstruction. Because diabetes mellitus is one of the major chronic diseases in nearly every country, the requirement for fat grafts in diabetes patients is expected to increase continuously. However, the circulation complications of diabetes are serious and have been shown to involve microvascular problems, impairing ischemia-driven neovascularization in particular. After injection, revascularization is vital to the survival of the grafted fat. In this study, the authors attempted to determine whether the diabetic condition inhibits the survival of injected fat due to impaired neovascularization.
METHODS
The rat scalp was used for testing fat graft survival. Forty-four seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to a diabetic group or a control group. 1.0 mL of processed fat was injected subcutaneously into the scalp of each rat. The effect of diabetes was evaluated by calculating the volume and the weight of the grafted fat and by histologically analyzing the fat sections.
RESULTS
The surviving fat graft volume and weight were considerably smaller in the diabetic group than in the control group (P<0.05), and histological evaluations showed less vascularity, and more cysts, vacuoles, and fibrosis in the diabetic group (P<0.05). Cellular integrity and inflammation were not considerably different in the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS
As the final outcome, we found that the presence of diabetes might impair the survival and the quality of fat grafts, as evidenced by lower fat graft weights and volumes and poor histologic graft quality.

Keyword

Diabetic angiopathies; Adipose tissue; Streptozocin

MeSH Terms

Adipose Tissue
Animals
Chronic Disease
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetic Angiopathies
Fibrosis
Graft Survival
Humans
Inflammation
Male
Rats*
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Scalp
Streptozocin
Transplants*
Vacuoles
Weights and Measures
Streptozocin
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