Korean J Intern Med.  2014 Jul;29(4):409-415.

Diet, microbiota, and inflammatory bowel disease: lessons from Japanese foods

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. takagast@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp

Abstract

The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease are rapidly increasing in Western countries and in developed Asian countries. Although biologic agents targeting the immune system have been effective in patients with IBD, cessation of treatment leads to relapse in the majority of patients, suggesting that intrinsic immune dysregulation is an effect, not a cause, of IBD. Dramatic changes in the environment, resulting in the dysregulated composition of intestinal microbiota or dysbiosis, may be associated with the fundamental causes of IBD. Japan now has upgraded water supply and sewerage systems, as well as dietary habits and antibiotic overuse that are similar to such features found in developed Western countries. The purpose of this review article was to describe the association of diet, particularly Japanese food and microbiota, with IBD.

Keyword

Diet; Microbiota; Inflammatory bowel diseases; Probiotics; Japanese food

MeSH Terms

Animals
*Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Diet/*ethnology
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Habits/ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/diagnosis/diet therapy/*ethnology/immunology/*microbiology
Intestines/immunology/*microbiology
Japan/epidemiology
*Microbiota
Prevalence
Probiotics/therapeutic use
Prognosis
Risk Factors
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