Maxillofac Plast Reconstr Surg.  2014 May;36(3):111-115.

Powdered Wound Dressing Materials Made from wild Silkworm Antheraea pernyi Silk Fibroin on Full-skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, Gangneung Wonju National University, Korea.
  • 2Department of Oral Anatomy, College of Dentistry and Research Institute of Oral Science, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Korea.
  • 3Sericultural & Apicultural Materials Division, National Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development Administration, Korea. hykweon@korea.kr

Abstract

PURPOSE
This study evaluated powdered burn wound dressing materials from wild silkworm fibroin in an animal model.
METHODS
Fifteen rats were used in this experiment. Full-thickness 2x2 cm burn wounds were created on the back of rats under anesthesia. In the two experimental groups, the wounds were treated with two different dressing materials made from silkworm fibroin. In the Control Group, natural healing without any dressing material was set as control. The wound surface area was measured at five days, seven days and 14 days. Wound healing was evaluated by histologic analysis.
RESULTS
By gross observation, there were no infections or severe inflammations through 14 days post-injury. The differences among groups were statistically significant at seven days and 14 days, postoperatively (P<0.037 and 0.001, respectively). By post hoc test, the defect size was significantly smaller in experimental Group 1 compared with the Control Group and experimental Group 2 at seven days postoperatively (P=0.022 and 0.029, respectively). The difference between Group 1 and Group 2 was statistically significant at 14 days postoperatively (P<0.001). Group 1 and control also differed significantly (P=0.002). Group 1 showed a smaller residual scar than the Control Group and Group 2 at 14 days post-injury. Histologic analysis showed more re-epithelization in Groups 1 and 2 than in the Control Groups.
CONCLUSION
Burn wound healing was accelerated with silk fibroin spun by wild silkworm Antheraea pernyi. There was no atypical inflammation with silk dressing materials. In conclusion, silk dressing materials can be used for treatment of burn wound.

Keyword

Full thickness burn wound; Wound dressing; Silk fibroin; Antheraea pernyi; Rats

MeSH Terms

Anesthesia
Animals
Bandages*
Bombyx*
Burns*
Cicatrix
Fibroins*
Inflammation
Models, Animal
Moths*
Rats*
Silk*
Wound Healing
Wounds and Injuries*
Fibroins
Silk
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