J Korean Med Sci.  2020 Mar;35(8):e58. 10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e58.

Hyperuricemia Is Not Predictive of Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-Dong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.
  • 2Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. jsdoc1186@hanmail.net
  • 3Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • 4Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 5Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Gangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
  • 6Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 7Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 8Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Bundang CHA Medical Center, CHA University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 9Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Although the association of hyperuricemia with an increased risk of mortality has been demonstrated in the context of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the long-term outcomes of hyperuricemia have not been studied in the case of stable COPD.
METHODS
We retrospectively analyzed baseline data of 240 men with stable COPD enrolled in the Korea Obstructive Lung Disease cohort. We evaluated associations between serum uric acid levels and clinical parameters, risk factors for all-cause mortality, and acute exacerbation of COPD.
RESULTS
The mean age of subjects was 66.4 ± 7.7 years, and the median follow-up time was 5.9 years. We identified no significant difference in terms of lung function or laboratory findings between patients with hyperuricemia and those without. Serum uric acid level was negatively associated with systemic inflammation indicated by neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (r = −0.211, P = 0.001). Univariate Cox regression analysis revealed hyperuricemia to not be associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality in men with stable COPD (hazard ratio [HR], 0.580; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.250-1.370; P = 0.213). In the multivariate Cox regression model, hyperuricemia was not an independent predictor of acute exacerbation (HR, 1.383; 95% CI, 0.977-1.959; P = 0.068).
CONCLUSION
Among men with stable COPD, hyperuricemia is not an independent predictor of all-cause mortality or future acute exacerbation of COPD. These results differ from those of previous studies on patients with acute exacerbation of COPD.

Keyword

Hyperuricemia; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Inflammation; Mortality; Acute Exacerbation

MeSH Terms

Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperuricemia*
Inflammation
Korea
Lung
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Male
Mortality
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive*
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Uric Acid
Uric Acid
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