J Korean Med Sci.  2016 Jun;31(6):829-835. 10.3346/jkms.2016.31.6.829.

A Study of Core Humanistic Competency for Developing Humanism Education for Medical Students

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. shinms@snu.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Medical Education, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 3Department of Forensic Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 4Department of Physiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 5Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 7Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 8Department of Clinical Medical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

The authors conducted a survey on essential humanistic competency that medical students should have, and on teaching methods that will effectively develop such attributes. The participants consisted of 154 medical school professors, 589 medical students at Seoul National University College of Medicine, 228 parents, and 161 medical school and university hospital staff. They answered nine questions that the authors created. According to the results, all groups chose "morality and a sense of ethics," a "sense of accountability," "communication skills," and "empathic ability" were selected as essential qualities. According to the evaluation on the extent to which students possess each quality, participants believed students had a high "sense of accountability" and "morality," whereas they thought students had low "empathic ability," "communicate," or "collaborate with others". In terms of effective teaching methods, all sub-groups preferred extracurricular activities including small group activities, debates, and volunteer services. With regard to the speculated effect of humanism education and the awareness of the need for colleges to offer it, all sub-groups had a positive response. However the professors and students expressed a relatively passive stance on introducing humanism education as a credited course. Most participants responded that they preferred a grading method based on their rate of participation, not a relative evaluation. In order to reap more comprehensive and lasting effects of humanism education courses in medical school, it is necessary to conduct faculty training, and continuously strive to develop new teaching methods.

Keyword

Medical Students; Medical Education; Humanism

MeSH Terms

Adult
Curriculum
Female
Health Personnel/*psychology
*Humanism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents/psychology
Students, Medical/*psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
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