J Korean Med Assoc.  2011 Sep;54(9):971-978. 10.5124/jkma.2011.54.9.971.

The impact of climate change on aeroalleregen and pediatric allergic diseases

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Center, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. bypyun@schmc.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Environmental Health Science, Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea.
  • 3Research Institute for Healthy Cities and Health Impact Assessment, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, Korea.

Abstract

The etiology of allergic diseases has been considered multi-factorial, comprising genetic, epigenetic, developmental, and environmental factors, as well as their complex interactions. The rising prevalence of allergic disease in recent decades could be explained by changes in environmental factors rather than genetic factors. Climate change has many significant impacts on aeroallergens such as pollen and mold. Therefore, climate changes are considered to be a key environmental factor affecting not only the prevalence but also the severity of allergic disease. In addition, these environmental factors might be more important for young children than for adults. While the concept that environmental factors including climate change would affect the characteristics of allergic disease is generally accepted, it is not enough to explain the mechanisms of the increase in the prevalence and severity of allergic diseases. Nevertheless, evidence exists that climate change has spurred changes in aeroallergens such as pollen and outdoor fungi, and that these changes are associated with the increased incidence of pediatric allergic disease.

Keyword

Aeroallergen; Allergic disease; Climate change; Prevalence

MeSH Terms

Adult
Child
Climate
Climate Change
Epigenomics
Fungi
Humans
Incidence
Pollen
Prevalence
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