Res Vestib Sci.  2016 Dec;15(4):141-146. 10.21790/rvs.2016.15.4.141.

Vestibular Paroxysmia Mimicking Benign Parxysmal Positional Vertigo

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. entnamsi@dsmc.or.kr

Abstract

Vestibular paroxysmia is the name given to the syndrome caused by vascular compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The main symptoms of vestibular paroxysmia are recurrent, spontaneous, brief attacks of spinning, non-spinning vertigo or positional vertigo that generally last less than one minute, with or without ear symptoms (tinnitus and hypoacusis). Prior to attributing a patient's symptoms to vestibular paroxysmia, however, clinicians must exclude common conditions like benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Menière's disease, vestibular neuritis and vestibular migraine. This is usually possible with a thorough history and bedside vestibular/ocular motor examination. Herein, we describe a patient with vestibular paroxysmia that mimicked resolved BPPV with a literature review.

Keyword

Vestibular paroxysmia; Carbamazepine; Neurovascular compression; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

MeSH Terms

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Carbamazepine
Ear
Humans
Migraine Disorders
Neuritis
Vertigo*
Vestibular Diseases
Vestibulocochlear Nerve
Carbamazepine
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