J Korean Neurol Assoc.  2004 Dec;22(6):643-645.

Sudden Deafness with Vertigo as a Sole Manifestation of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Infarction

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Neurology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. hlee@dsmc.or.kr
  • 2Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, , Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

Abstract

Although sudden deafness occurs with anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction, the deafness is usually associated with other brainstem or cerebellum sign such as crossed sensory loss, lateral gaze palsy, facial weakness, Horner syndrome or limb dysmetria. An 84-year-old woman suddenly developed right-sided tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo, and vomiting. Audiometry and electronystagmography documented absent auditory and vestibular functions on the right side. T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI showed a tiny infarct in the right lateral inferior pontine tegmentum. Anterior inferior cerebellar artery occlusion can cause sudden deafness and vertigo without brainstem or cerebellar signs.

Keyword

Sudden deafness; Vertigo; Anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction

MeSH Terms

Aged, 80 and over
Arteries*
Audiometry
Brain Stem
Cerebellar Ataxia
Cerebellum
Deafness
Electronystagmography
Extremities
Facial Paralysis
Female
Hearing Loss
Hearing Loss, Sudden*
Horner Syndrome
Humans
Infarction*
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Tinnitus
Vertigo*
Vomiting
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