Korean J Otolaryngol-Head Neck Surg.  2006 May;49(5):557-560.

Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Infarction Misdiagnosed as Labyrinthitis: A Case Report

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Gil Medical Center, Gachon Medical School, Incheon, Korea. chochmd@gilhospital.com

Abstract

Anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction is the second most common cause of brainstem stroke, and usually accompanied by vertigo, unilateral deafness, ipsilateral facial weakness and ataxia. These symptoms can be confused with other peripheral causes of sudden hearing loss accompanying dizziness including acute labyrinthitis, idiopathic sudden hearing loss, perilymphatic fistula and acoustic neuroma. This case report presents a man who first visited our clinic for sudden hearing loss with vertigo, and whom we treated for acute labyrinthitis. However, 3 days later, left facial numbness was observed and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an anterior inferior cerebellar infarction. The patient was then transferred to the neurology department and treated with anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents. After 7 days of treatment, the hearing loss and dizziness were improved and the facial numbness resolved.

Keyword

Cerebellar infarction; Labyrinthitis

MeSH Terms

Arteries*
Ataxia
Brain Stem Infarctions
Deafness
Dizziness
Ear, Inner*
Fistula
Hearing Loss
Hearing Loss, Sudden
Humans
Hypesthesia
Infarction*
Labyrinthitis*
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neurology
Neuroma, Acoustic
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Vertigo
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
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