J Korean Acad Prosthodont.  2011 Jul;49(3):214-221.

Effect of bone-implant contact pattern on bone strain distribution: finite element method study

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. 0504heo@hanmail.net
  • 2Department of Applied Statistics, University of Suwon, Suwon, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE
To date most of finite element analysis assumed the presence of 100% contact between bone and implant, which is inconsistent with clinical reality. In human retrieval study bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio ranged from 20 to 80%. The objective of this study was to explore the influence of bone-implant contact pattern on bone of the interface using nonlinear 3-dimensional finite element analysis.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
A computer tomography-based finite element models with two types of implant (Mark III Branemark(R), Inplant(R)) which placed in the maxillary 2nd premolar area were constructed. Two different degrees of bone-implant contact ratio (40, 70%) each implant design were simulated. 5 finite element models were constructed each bone-implant contact ratio and implant design, and sum of models was 40. The position of bone-implant contact was determined according to random shuffle method. Elements of bone-implant contact in group W (wholly randomized osseointegration) was randomly selected in terms of total implant length including cortical and cancellous bone, while ones in group S (segmentally randomized osseointegration) was randomly selected each 0.75 mm vertically and horizontally.
RESULTS
Maximum von Mises strain between group W and group S was not significantly different regardless of bone-implant contact ratio and implant design (P=.939). Peak von Mises strain of 40% BIC was significantly lower than one of 70% BIC (P=.007). There was no significant difference between Mark III Branemark(R) and Inplant(R) in 40% BIC, while average of peak von Mises strain for Inplant(R) was significantly lower (4886 +/- 1034 microm/m) compared with MK III Branemark(R) (7134 +/- 1232 microm/m) in BIC 70% (P<.0001).
CONCLUSION
Assuming bone-implant contact in finite element method, whether the contact elements in bone were wholly randomly or segmentally randomly selected using random shuffle method, both methods could be effective to be no significant difference regardless of sample size.

Keyword

FEA; Bone-implant contact; Implant; Implant design; Randomized osseointegration

MeSH Terms

Bicuspid
Finite Element Analysis
Humans
Nitrogen Mustard Compounds
Sample Size
Sprains and Strains
Nitrogen Mustard Compounds

Figure

  • Fig. 1. The bone model represents CT generated images of the second premolar of the human maxillary bone to provide bone geometric information. The size of the edentulous area used was approximately 20 mm mesiodistally, 12 mm buccolingully and 22 mm in the bone height.

  • Fig. 2. Two types of implant models employed in this study. A: MK III Bra®nemark® implant with external hex, B: Inplant® with Morse-taper.

  • Fig. 3. The element size near bone-implant interface was 0.1 - 0.12 mm for more reality, the one of the distant zone from the interface was 0.3 - 0.5 mm for model simplification.

  • Fig. 4. Loading condition applied 150 N at 11 degree angle relative to the lingual cusp.

  • Fig. 5. Constraints of bone model and implant-abutment interface. A: boundary condition of bone model, B: tied condition and frictional contact between abutment and abutment screw.

  • Fig. 6. Comparison between S (segmentally randomized osseointegration) and W (wholly randomized osseointegration) group according to osseointegraton degrees (40, 70%). ‘osseo’ is osseointegration degree and ‘attach M’ is attachment method of bone-implant contact.

  • Fig. 7. Comparison between S (segmentally randomized osseointegration) and W (wholly randomized osseointegration) group according to implant design. ‘attach M’ is attachment method of bone-implant contact.

  • Fig. 8. Comparison between S (segmentally randomized osseointegration) and W (wholly randomized osseointegration) group including osseointegration degree and implant design. ‘attach M’ is attachment method of bone-implant contact.


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