Nutr Res Pract.  2008 Sep;2(3):178-183.

Anthropometric indices and selected nutrient intakes of young children in Kwangju, Korea

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583-0806, USA. jdriskell@unl.edu
  • 2Department of Food & Nutrition, Duksung Women's University, 419 Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-714, Korea.

Abstract

The assessment of children's nutritional intakes is important because any nutritional inadequacies or toxicities may have adverse consequences. Studies on the nutritional intakes of Korean children are limited. The aims of this study were to determine anthropometric indices, estimate selected nutrient intakes of young Korean children, and compare these intakes with current Dietary Reference Intakes for Koreans. This study included 136 healthy children (65 boys, 71 girls), 2-6 y old, living in Kwangju, Korea. Weights and heights were measured. Three consecutive 24-h food recalls were obtained. According to International Obesity TaskForce BMI cutoffs, 8% were overweight and 2% were obese. The energy intakes of 40% were < Korean Estimated Energy Requirements, while all subjects consumed > or = Korean Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for protein. The majority of the children consumed > Korean EAR for iron, zinc, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and niacin. Vitamin E intakes of 65% of the Korean children were < Korean Adequate Intake, and approximately half of the subjects had < Korean EAR for calcium and for folate. Many young children in Kwangju, Korea, likely have inadequate status of calcium, folate, and vitamin E.

Keyword

Anthropometrics; nutrient intakes; children; Korea

MeSH Terms

Calcium
Child
Ear
Folic Acid
Humans
Iron
Korea
Niacin
Obesity
Overweight
Riboflavin
Thiamine
Vitamin B 6
Vitamin E
Vitamins
Weights and Measures
Zinc
Calcium
Folic Acid
Iron
Niacin
Riboflavin
Thiamine
Vitamin B 6
Vitamin E
Vitamins
Zinc
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