Korean J Community Nutr.  2001 May;6(2):130-138.

The Effect of Taste Preference on Anthropometric Measurements and Nutrient intakes in Children

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Food and Nutrtion, chonnam National University, Kwangju, Korea.

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of taste preference(sweet, sour, salty, hot) on anthropometric measurements and nutrient intakes of 256 primary school children in Kwangju. There was no significant difference in the anthropometric measurements according to the sweet taste preference. Height, weight, triceps, abdomen, and chest circumferences of the group preferring a sour taste, however, were significantly lower than those of the other groups. The height of the group preferring a salty taste was significantly shorter than that of the other groups and there was a tendency toward high systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. The waist circumference of the group not preferring the hot taste was larger than those of the other groups. There was no significant difference in the energy intake according to the sweet taste preference. The protein intake of the group preferring a sweet taste as significantly lower than that of the other groups. The fiber intake of the group preferring a sour taste was significantly higher than that of the other groups. There were no significant differences in the nutrient intakes according to the salty taste preference. The energy intake of the group preferring a hot taste was lower than that of the other groups. The results show that children's taste preferences influence anthropometric measurements and nutrient intakes. These results suggest that children's eating behaviors are in needs of correction. The findings of this study should be applied to nutrition education to ensure better physical fitness of children.

Keyword

taste preference; anthropometric measurements; nutrient intakes; children

MeSH Terms

Abdomen
Blood Pressure
Child*
Education
Energy Intake
Feeding Behavior
Gwangju
Humans
Physical Fitness
Thorax
Waist Circumference
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