Korean J Urol.  2006 Feb;47(2):201-205. 10.4111/kju.2006.47.2.201.

Expression Pattern of Neuroendocrine Cells and Survivin in the Prostate of Rabbits

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Urology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Korea. Beetho@schch.co.kr
  • 2Department of Pathology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The neuroendocrine cell (NE cell) is thought to play an important role in the development of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Survivin is one of the IAPs (inhibitors of apoptosis), and it is expressed in the NE cell and in most of the common cancers, but not in normal tissue. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression pattern of the NE cell and survivin in the prostate of rabbits.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
The 9 rabbits underwent orchiectomy and their prostates were removed at 0 weeks (control), 2 weeks and 6 weeks after orchiectomy. Each of the prostatic tissue specimens was stained with H&E; immunohistochemical staining was done for chromogranin A, synaptophysin and survivin, and the tissue specimens were then examined by microscopy.
RESULTS
In the prostate of rabbits, most of the NE cells were located between the epithelial gland and the stroma. NE differentiation occurred 6 weeks after orchiectomy. The location of cells that were positive for survivin was almost same as that of the NE cells.
CONCLUSIONS
The main location of NE cells in the prostate of rabbits was between the epithelial gland and the stroma, and NE differentiation occurred 6 weeks after orchiectomy, the same as in a human or a dog. The location of survivin positive cells coincided with that of the NE cells. Therefore, a rabbit seems to be a suitable animal model for the study of the NE cell.

Keyword

APUD cells; Survivin; Prostate; Orchiectomy; Rabbits

MeSH Terms

Animals
APUD Cells
Chromogranin A
Dogs
Humans
Microscopy
Models, Animal
Neuroendocrine Cells*
Orchiectomy
Prostate*
Prostatic Neoplasms
Rabbits*
Synaptophysin
Chromogranin A
Synaptophysin

Figure

  • Fig. 1 Hematoxylin Eosin stain (A-C) and immunohistochemical stain with monoclonal antibodies to CgA (D-F), SNP (G-I) and survivin (J-L) in the prostate of rabbits before orchiectomy (A, D, G, J), 2 weeks after (B, E, H, K), and 6 weeks after orchiectomy (C, F, I, L) (×100: A-C) (×400: D-L). In the prostate of rabbits, the shape of the acini became shrunken and the number of epithelial cells are decreased after orchiectomy. Although most NE cells are located between the stroma and the glandular epithelium, there is the small number of NE cells in the glandular epithelium, as noted on the SNP staining. NE differentiation is found 6 weeks after of orchectomy. Also, the cells that have a positive reaction to survivin are found in all of the three groups. The location of the cells positive to survivin is compatible with that of the NE cell, and the number of cells is increased after 4 weeks.


Cited by  1 articles

Expression of Survivin and Bcl-2 in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Treated with a 5-alpha-reductase Inhibitor
Woo Heon Cha, Tae Jung Jang, Kyung Seop Lee
Korean J Urol. 2008;49(3):242-247.    doi: 10.4111/kju.2008.49.3.242.


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