Ann Rehabil Med.  2017 Oct;41(5):725-733. 10.5535/arm.2017.41.5.725.

Subcortical Aphasia After Stroke

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon, Korea.
  • 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 3Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. njpaik@snu.ac.kr

Abstract


OBJECTIVE
To evaluate the types and severity of subcortical aphasia after stroke and to determine the predictors of the degree of aphasic impairment.
METHODS
Medical records of 38 patients with post-stroke subcortical aphasia (19 males; mean age, 61.7±13.8 years) were reviewed retrospectively with respect to the following tests: the Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery (K-WAB), the Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI), and the Fugl-Meyer Index (FMI). The severity of aphasia was evaluated by the aphasia quotient (AQ) and the language quotient (LQ).
RESULTS
Anomic aphasia was the most frequent type of aphasia (n=15, 39.5%), and the lesion most frequently observed in subcortical aphasia was located in the basal ganglia (n=19, 50.0%). Patients with lesions in the basal ganglia exhibited the lowest scores on the FMI for the upper extremities (p=0.04). Severity of aphasia was significantly correlated with the K-MBI (Pearson correlation coefficient: γ=0.45, p=0.01 for AQ and γ=0.53, p=0.01 for LQ) and FMI scores for the lower extremities (γ=0.43, p=0.03 for AQ and γ=0.49, p=0.05 for LQ). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, K-MBI remained the only explanatory variable closely associated with aphasia severity.
CONCLUSION
This study showed the general characteristics of post-stroke subcortical aphasia, and it revealed that K-MBI was an associated and explanatory factor for aphasia severity.

Keyword

Aphasia; Stroke; Basal ganglia; Cerebrovascular disease; Language tests; Association

MeSH Terms

Anomia
Aphasia*
Basal Ganglia
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Humans
Language Tests
Logistic Models
Lower Extremity
Male
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies
Stroke*
Upper Extremity
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