J Korean Acad Prosthodont.  2016 Oct;54(4):458-467. 10.4047/jkap.2016.54.4.458.

A literature review on cementation of implant prosthesis

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Prosthodontics and Research Institute of Oral Science, College of Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung, Republic of Korea. lila@gwnu.ac.kr

Abstract

Cement-retained implant prosthesis has several advantages in the esthetic and occlusal aspects. However, the difficulty of the retrievability and the possibility of peri-implantitis induced by the cement excess would be a threatening factor to the implant prognosis. Peri-implantitis resulting from the remaining cement could occur later on to the patients with periodontitis history. Retention can be controlled by selecting the right cement type. Retention of the cement was the strongest in the resin cement, followed by resin modified glass ionomer cement, poIycarboxylate cement, zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement. Retention of the provisional cement weakened after thermocycling. Other factors such as the abutment number, abutment alignment, height and taper of the abutment can also affect the total retention. To the success of the cement-retained prosthesis, it's important to select the right cement for the clinical purpose. The prosthesis should be fabricated in accordance with the biomechanical requirements. The prosthesis should be cemented with the techniques to reduce the excess cement as much as possible. In addition, the excess cement should be identified using the radiography and carefully removed.

Keyword

Implant; Cement; Retention; Peri-implantitis; Radiography

MeSH Terms

Cementation*
Glass Ionomer Cements
Humans
Peri-Implantitis
Periodontitis
Prognosis
Prostheses and Implants*
Radiography
Resin Cements
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Glass Ionomer Cements
Resin Cements
Zinc Phosphate Cement
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