Gastrointest Interv.  2017 Jul;6(2):105-113. 10.18528/gii.160007.

Self-expandable metal stent placement for recurrent cancer in a surgically-altered stomach

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. hysong@amc.seoul.kr

Abstract

Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and most frequent causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Radical surgical resection accomplished by total or distal gastrectomy represents the mainstay of curative treatment for gastric cancer; however, recurrent cancer still occurs in a significant amount of cases. Patients with recurrent cancer are generally incurable and often experience debilitating symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, dysphagia, dehydration, and malnutrition, because of malignant gastric-outlet, duodenal, and jejunal obstructions. Consequently, such patients experience progressive deterioration of quality of life. If bypass surgery has not already been performed, it is not usually appropriated in the context of recurrent cancer and is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic or fluoroscopic self-expandable metal stent placement represents an effective and safe method for palliative treatment of recurrent cancer in patients with the surgically-altered stomach. Therefore, it should be considered as the first-line option. Importantly, accurate knowledge of the surgically-altered anatomy and stricture location are critical to achieve successful treatment outcomes.

Keyword

Dysphagia; Gastric outlet obstruction; Self expandable metal stents; Stomach neoplasoms

MeSH Terms

Constriction, Pathologic
Deglutition Disorders
Dehydration
Gastrectomy
Gastric Outlet Obstruction
Humans
Malnutrition
Methods
Mortality
Nausea
Palliative Care
Quality of Life
Self Expandable Metallic Stents
Stents*
Stomach Neoplasms
Stomach*
Vomiting
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