Nutr Res Pract.  2013 Jun;7(3):233-241.

A healthy dietary pattern consisting of a variety of food choices is inversely associated with the development of metabolic syndrome

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Foods and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702, Korea. ibaik@kookmin.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Food and Nutrition, Research Institute of Obesity Sciences, Sungshin Women's University, Seoul 142-100, Korea.
  • 3Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan 425-707, Korea.

Abstract

There are limited data on healthy dietary patterns protective against metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) development. We identified dietary patterns among middle-aged and older adults and investigated the associations with the incidence of MetSyn. A population-based prospective cohort study included 5,251 male and female Koreans aged 40-69 years. At baseline, all individuals were free of MetSyn, other major metabolic diseases, and known cardiovascular disease or cancer. Cases of MetSyn were ascertained over a 6-year of follow-up. Dietary patterns and their factor scores were generated by factor analysis using the data of a food frequency questionnaire. We performed pooled logistic regression analysis to estimate multivariable-adjusted relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for associations between factor scores and MetSyn risk. Two dietary patterns were identified; (1) a healthy dietary pattern, which included a variety of foods such as fish, seafood, vegetables, seaweed, protein foods, fruits, dairy products, and grains; and (2) an unhealthy dietary pattern, which included a limited number of food items. After controlling for confounding factors, factor scores for the healthy dietary pattern were inversely associated with MetSyn risk (P-value for trend < 0.05) while those for the unhealthy dietary pattern had no association. Individuals in the top quintile of the healthy diet scores showed a multivariable-adjusted RR [95% CI] of 0.76 [0.60-0.97] for MetSyn risk compared with those in the bottom quintile. The beneficial effects were derived from inverse associations with abdominal obesity, low HDL-cholesterol levels, and high fasting glucose levels. Our findings suggest that a variety of healthy food choices is recommended to prevent MetSyn.

Keyword

Dietary pattern; food choices; metabolic syndrome incidence; prospective study

MeSH Terms

Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Fasting
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Glucose
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Diseases
Obesity, Abdominal
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Seafood
Seaweed
Vegetables
Glucose
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