Korean J Med.  2016 May;90(5):427-432. 10.3904/kjm.2016.90.5.427.

AKI and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy after Bee Venom-induced Anaphylaxis

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, KEPCO Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. gladys0216@naver.com
  • 2Department of Emergency Medicine, KEPCO Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Bee venom-induced anaphylaxis usually causes urticaria, angioedema, respiratory distress, nausea, and vomiting. Occasionally, it leads to unusual complications such as acute myocardial infarction, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, rhabdomyolysis, intravascular hemolysis, and acute kidney injury. Renal complications are rare, and there are only two cases of acute kidney injury associated with rhabdomyolysis due to multiple bee stings reported in Korea. We report a 67-year-old woman who presented at our emergency department with confusion, respiratory distress, and dizziness after multiple bee stings. She was diagnosed with anaphylactic shock. There was acute kidney injury associated with rhabdomyolysis and heart failure related to takotsubo cardiomyopathy, all of which indicated unusual and fatal complications. Her condition worsened, almost requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. However, the patient recovered without cardiac or renal complications within 30 days of therapy with hydration and diuretics.

Keyword

Bee venoms; Anaphylaxis; Acute kidney injury; Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

MeSH Terms

Acute Kidney Injury
Aged
Anaphylaxis*
Angioedema
Arrhythmias, Cardiac
Bee Venoms
Bees*
Bites and Stings
Diuretics
Dizziness
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Heart Failure
Hemolysis
Humans
Intubation
Korea
Myocardial Infarction
Nausea
Respiration, Artificial
Rhabdomyolysis
Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy*
Urticaria
Vomiting
Bee Venoms
Diuretics
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