Anesth Pain Med.  2021 Jul;16(3):295-298. 10.17085/apm.20096.

Transcutaneous neurostimulatory treatment for peripheral polyneuropathy induced by hypereosinophilic syndrome - A case report -

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea

Abstract

Background
Hypereosinophilic syndrome is a rare disease that increases the number of circulating eosinophils in the body. It has many complications, including peripheral polyneuropathy. Peripheral polyneuropathy often does not respond well to conventional therapies. Transcutaneous neurostimulatory treatment, also known as scrambler therapy, is an alternative modality for the treatment of chronic retractable pain. Case: A 47-year-old woman presented with complaints of bilateral calf pain. She had been under treatment for peripheral polyneuropathy induced by hypereosinophilic syndrome for 7 years. Pharmacologic treatment did not affect the patient’s symptoms.
Conclusions
Transcutaneous neurostimulatory treatment was administered to the patient. It was effective on her symptoms, and the effect of pain alleviation continued for 3 months.

Keyword

Drug therapy; Eosinophils; Intractable pain; Peripheral nervous system diseases; Polyneuropathies; Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation
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