Pediatr Infect Vaccine.  2015 Aug;22(2):55-62. 10.14776/piv.2015.22.2.55.

Effectiveness of Varicella Zoster Immune Globulin Administration within 96 Hours versus more than 96 Hours after Exposure to the Varicella-Zoster Virus

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. yaejeankim@skku.edu
  • 2Department of Pediatrics, Good Gangan Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 3Department of Laboratory Medicine and Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE
Varicella Zoster Immune Globulin (VZIG) is available in Korea for post-exposure prophylaxis of the Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in high-risk patients. In July 2013, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC) recommended extending the time for administration of VariZIG(R) from within 96 hours up to 10 days after VZV exposure. This study was performed to analyze the effectiveness of VZIG prophylaxis between the two groups of patients who received VZIG within 96 hours and more than 96 hours of exposure to varicella.
METHODS
A retrospective chart review was performed in pediatric patients who received VZIG at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from January 2001 to December 2012.
RESULTS
A total of 91 patients were identified. Fifty-seven patients were male (62.6%) and the median age was 5.91 years. Thirty-nine patients (42.9%) were exposed to VZV in the hospital. Underlying diseases were solid tumors (41.8%), hematologic malignancies (40.7%), and others (17.5%). Forty-five patients (49.5%) were hematopoietic cell transplant recipients. Seventy-four patients (81.3%) received VZIG within 96 hours after VZV exposure. There was no significant difference in the development of chickenpox between the two groups (2.7% vs. 5.9%, P=0.4664). In 22 seronegative patients, we also observed no significant difference between the groups in terms of the development of chickenpox (6.6% vs. 0%, P=0.667).
CONCLUSIONS
This study showed that the effectiveness of VZIG for the prevention of chickenpox was comparable between patients who received VZIG within 96 hours and those who received VZIG more than 96 hours after exposure to VZV.

Keyword

Varicella-zoster virus; VZIG; VariZIG; Prophylaxis

MeSH Terms

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Chickenpox*
Hematologic Neoplasms
Herpes Zoster*
Herpesvirus 3, Human*
Humans
Korea
Male
Post-Exposure Prophylaxis
Retrospective Studies
Seoul
Transplants

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