Arch Craniofac Surg.  2019 Oct;20(5):304-309. 10.7181/acfs.2019.00416.

Surgical approach for venous malformation in the head and neck

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea. hy-chung@knu.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
  • 3Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
  • 4Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
  • 5Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Treatment for venous malformations of the head and neck includes sclerotherapy, surgical resection, or a combination of both. Surgical resection can remove or reduce the volume of vascular lesions; however, surgery can cause postoperative scarring and potential surgical complications. This study sought to determine the effectiveness of surgery for the treatment of venous malformations of the head and neck.
METHODS
A retrospective review of the medical records of patients who received surgeries for venous malformations of the head and neck from January 2011 to July 2019 was performed. Using clinical photographs, preoperative and postoperative Doppler ultrasonography, outpatient clinic records, and operation records, the postoperative result and complications were evaluated for each case.
RESULTS
Among patients who visited our vascular anomalies clinic, 43 patients (ratio of male to female= 24:19) received surgeries for venous malformations of the head and neck. Twenty-nine patients had undergone surgery only, five patients received sclerotherapy after surgery, and nine patients received surgery after preoperative sclerotherapy. In postoperative evaluations, the result was excellent in 24 patients, good in 18 patients, and poor in one patient. Four patients experienced a recurrence of lesions with lagophthalmos, drooping of the corner of the mouth, partial wound necrosis, and scar widening found in one patient each.
CONCLUSION
Because the head and neck region is the most exposed area in the body, more active implementation of surgical treatments with or without sclerotherapy is essential to reduce the functional and cosmetic impairments associated with venous malformations.

Keyword

Head; Neck; Surgery, plastic; Vascular malformations

MeSH Terms

Ambulatory Care Facilities
Cicatrix
Head*
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Mouth
Neck*
Necrosis
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Sclerotherapy
Surgery, Plastic
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vascular Malformations
Wounds and Injuries
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