J Sleep Med.  2019 Jun;16(1):53-55. 10.13078/jsm.19017.

Central Sleep Apnea without Cheyne-Stokes Breathing Following an Acute Cerebral Infarction

Affiliations
  • 1Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, Korea. neurofan@schmc.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is attributed to medical or neurological conditions including stroke. The association of lesion location and CSA in patients with ischemic stroke has not been well elucidated. A 69-year-old man with a history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus was admitted due to stroke. The brain magnetic resonance imaging showed an acute ischemic stroke in the right ventral thalamus and adjacent hypothalamus. During hospitalization, polysomnography (PSG) was performed because repetitive cessation of respiration during sleep was observed by chance. PSG showed severe CSA; the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 73.5 with a minimum oxygen saturation of 89% and central apnea index (CAI) was 63.0. Two years later, follow-up PSG showed that AHI was 7.2 with a minimum oxygen saturation of 91% and CAI was 1.0. We report the patient with CSA after ischemic stroke with right thalamus and adjacent hypothalamus, which resolved spontaneously with time.

Keyword

Stroke; Central sleep apnea; Polysomnography

MeSH Terms

Aged
Brain
Cerebral Infarction*
Diabetes Mellitus
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Hypertension
Hypothalamus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Oxygen
Polysomnography
Respiration*
Sleep Apnea, Central*
Stroke
Thalamus
Oxygen
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