J Prev Med Public Health.  2017 Sep;50(5):328-335. 10.3961/jpmph.17.046.

Housing Conditions Contribute to Underweight in Children: An Example From Rural Villages in Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia

Affiliations
  • 1School of Public Health, College of Mandala Waluya Kendari Health Science, Kendari, Indonesia. tasnim_ialf@yahoo.com
  • 2College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
  • 3College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Abstract


OBJECTIVES
The prevalence of underweight in children under 5 years of age is anomalously high in Konawe District, Southeast Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. This state of affairs may be related to poor housing conditions, such as limited access to clean water, the absence of a sanitary latrine, and the use of poor housing materials. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effect of housing conditions on underweight in under-5 children in Konawe District.
METHODS
This study was conducted in 2013 in 5 health centres in Konawe District, Southeast Sulawesi Province, and used a case-control study design. The study recruited 400 under-5 children, including 100 of whom were cases and 300 of whom were age-matched controls (1:3). Cases were underweight children, while the controls were children with a normal nutritional status. The independent variables were the availability and types of water and latrine facilities and housing materials (roof, wall, and floor). The statistical analysis used Cox regression.
RESULTS
A lack of water availability (odds ratio [OR], 5.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.7 to 9.5; p<0.001), a lack of latrine availability in the home (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.5 to 4.0; p<0.001), and poor-quality roofing materials (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.7; p<0.02) significantly contributed to underweight in children. In contrast, the walls and the floors did not contribute to under-5 year children being underweight (p=0.09 and p=0.71, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS
Sanitation facilities and roofing were identified as important factors to address in order to improve children's nutritional status. Children's health status was directly impacted by food intake via their nutritional status.

Keyword

Living facilities; Child; Case-control studies; Underweight; Nutritional status; Indonesia

MeSH Terms

Case-Control Studies
Child Health
Child*
Eating
Housing*
Humans
Indonesia*
Nutritional Status
Prevalence
Sanitation
Thinness*
Toilet Facilities
Water
Water
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