Korean J Hosp Palliat Care.  2017 Sep;20(3):177-187. 10.14475/kjhpc.2017.20.3.177.

A Qualitative Study of Physicians' Perspectives on Non-Cancer Hospice-Palliative Care in Korea: Focus on AIDS, COPD and Liver Cirrhosis

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Family Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. sunhyun@yahoo.com, leejeny@paik.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Family Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.
  • 3Department of Family Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.
  • 4Department of Family Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Goyang, Korea.
  • 5Department of Hematology and Oncology, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Ulsan, Korea.
  • 6Palliative and Hospice Center, Bobath Memorial Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE
From August 2017, hospice-palliative care (HPC) will be provided to patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and liver cirrhosis in Korea. To contribute to building a non-cancer (NC) hospice-palliative care model, NC specialists were interviewed regarding the goals, details, and provision methods of the model.
METHODS
Four physicians specializing in HPC of cancer patients formulated a semi-structured interview with questions extracted from literature review of 85 articles on NC HPC. Eleven NC disease specialists were interviewed, and their answers were analyzed according to the qualitative content analysis process.
RESULTS
The interviewees said as follows: It is difficult to define endstage NC patients. HPC for cancer patients and that for NC patients share similar goals and content. However, emphasis should be placed on alleviating other physical symptoms and emotional care rather than pain control. Timing of the care provision should be when patients are diagnosed as "end stage". Special issues should be considered for each NC disease (e.g., use of anti-retroviral drugs for AIDS patients, oxygen supply for COPD patients suffering from dyspnea, liver transplantation for patients with liver cirrhosis) and education should be provided to healthcare professionals. NC patients tend to negatively perceive HPC, and the government's financial assistance is insufficient.
CONCLUSION
It is necessary to define end-stage NC patients through in-depth discussion to minimize issues that will likely accompany the expansion of care recipients. This requires cooperation between medical staff caring for NC patients and HPC givers for cancer patients.

Keyword

Hospices; Palliative care; Delivery of health care; Qualitative research; Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Liver cirrhosis

MeSH Terms

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Delivery of Health Care
Dyspnea
Education
Hospices
Humans
Korea*
Liver Cirrhosis*
Liver Transplantation
Liver*
Medical Staff
Oxygen
Palliative Care
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive*
Qualitative Research
Specialization
Oxygen
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