J Korean Med Assoc.  2002 Jun;45(6):676-684. 10.5124/jkma.2002.45.6.676.

Smoking Cessation : Behavioral Therapies Based on Evidence

Abstract

Physicians should take advantage of each contact with smokers to encourage and support smoking cessation. Once a patient is identified as a smoker, tools are available to assess readiness for change. Using motivational interviewing techniques, the physician can help the patient move from the precontemplation stage through the contemplation stage to the preparation stage, where plans are made for the initiation of quitting smoking. Continued motivational techniques and support are needed in the action stage, when the patient stops smoking. Major treatment guidelines emphasize that three treatment elements in particular are effective for smoking cessation intervention : nicotine replacement therapy, social support for cessation, and skills training/problem solving. Guidelines emphasize the dose-response relationship between the intensity and duration of treatment and its effectiveness. In general, the more intense the treatment, the more effective it is in producing long-term abstinence from tobacco. Group or individual behavioral counselling can facilitate smoking cessation and improve the cessation rates. A plan should be in place for recycling the patient through the appropriate stages if relapse should occur.

Keyword

Smoking cessation; Behavioral therapy; Evidence-based medicine; Practice guideline

MeSH Terms

Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Motivational Interviewing
Nicotine
Recurrence
Recycling
Smoke*
Smoking Cessation*
Smoking*
Tobacco
Nicotine
Smoke
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