J Korean Acad Nurs Adm.  2011 Mar;17(1):115-126.

Work Stress, Turnover Intention and Burnout among Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Nursing, Namseoul University, Korea. yumichonsa@yahoo.co.kr

Abstract

PURPOSE
This study was done to identify differences in work environment, work stress, turnover intention and burnout and investigate the relationship among these variables in nurses in Korean Neonatal Intensive Care Units.
METHODS
Participants were 242 nurses working in 13 general hospitals. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), work stress with the instrument by Gu & Kim (1994), and turnover intention with the scale by Kim & Lee (2001). Size of the NICU, nurse to patient ratio, and communication satisfaction were included in work environment. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regression analysis with SPSS WIN program.
RESULTS
The mean score for work stress in NICU nurses was 3.43 points, for burnout, 2.72 points, and for turnover intention, 4.64 points. Burnout and turnover intention level of participants were moderate-high. Work stress, communication dissatisfaction with physician, and clinical career accounted for 33% of variance in burnout. Significant differences were found between size of NICU and staffing related to environmental characteristics in turnover intention and burnout.
CONCLUSIONS
Results indicate that effective communication with coworkers and institutional support for appropriate staffing according to number of beds will help to prevent work stress, burnout, and ultimately, nurses' resignations.

Keyword

Stress; Turnover; Burnout; Intensive care unit; Neonatal

MeSH Terms

Hospitals, General
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Intention
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