Korean J Otorhinolaryngol-Head Neck Surg.  2007 Oct;50(10):941-946.

Three Cases of Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Infarction Mimicking Acute Peripheral Vestibulopathy

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan, Korea. chungyw701@dreamwiz.com

Abstract

Vestibular neuritis represents as a spinning type of dizziness accompanied by nausea, vomiting. Central vertigo such as cerebellar infarction may present with nonspecific symptoms similar to those of vestibular neuritis. Basilar artery supplies the cerebellum by branching out into superior cerebellar artery, anterior inferior cerebellar artery, and posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient had spinning type of vertigo, nausea, vomiting on the day of visit without any otologic symptoms. Only spontaneous nystagmus was observed. After admission, the patient's dizziness aggravated and emergency brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed. As a result, infarction in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area was observed. Anticoagulant therapy was performed. Dizziness decreased, the follow-up imaging study showed improvement of the infarction, and the patient was discharged. We experienced three cases of PICA infarction presenting as peripheral types of dizziness, and therefore we are reporting the case.

Keyword

Brain infarction; Posterior inferior cerebellar artery; Vestibular neuronitis

MeSH Terms

Arteries
Basilar Artery
Brain
Brain Infarction
Cerebellum
Dizziness
Emergencies
Equipment and Supplies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infarction*
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Nausea
Pica
Vertigo
Vestibular Neuronitis*
Vomiting
Full Text Links
  • KJORL-HN
Actions
Cited
CITED
export Copy
Close
Share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
Similar articles
    DB Error: unknown error