J Korean Radiol Soc.  2001 Dec;45(6):539-545. 10.3348/jkrs.2001.45.6.539.

Usefulness of Combined Fat- and Fluid-Suppressed SPIR-FLAIR Images in Optic Neuritis: Comparison with Fat-Suppressed SPIR or STIR Images or STIR images

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University.

Abstract

PURPOSE
To compare the usefulness of combined fat- and fluid-suppressed selective partial inversion recovery-fluid attenuated inversion recovery(SPIR-FLAIR) images in the detection of high signal intensity of the optic nerve in optic neuritis with that of fat-suppressed selective partial inversion recovery(SPIR) or short inversion time inversion recovery(STIR) images.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
Two radiologists independently analyzed randomly mixed MR images of 16 lesions in 14 patients (M:F=7:7; mean age, 40years) in whom optic neuritis had been clinically diagnosed. All subjects underwent both SPIR-FLAIR and fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR imaging, in a blind fashion. In order to evaluate the optic nerve, coronal images perpendicular to its long axis were obtained. The detection rate of high signal intensity of the optic nerve, the radiologists' preferred imaging sequences, and intersubject consistency of detection were evaluated. 'High signal intensity' was defined as the subjective visual evaluation of increased signal intensity compared with that of the contralateral optic nerve or that of white matter.
RESULTS
The mean detection rate of high signal intensity of the optic nerve was 90% for combined fat- and fluid-suppressed SPIR-FLAIR images, and 59% for fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images. In all cases in which the signal intensity observed on SPIR-FLAIR images was normal, that on fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images was also normal. The radiologists preferred the contrast properties of SPIR-FLAIR to those of fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images.
CONCLUSION
In the diagnosis of optic neuritis using MRI, combined fat- and fluid-suppressed SPIR-FLAIR images were more useful for the detection of high signal intensity of the optic nerve than fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR images. For the evaluation of optic neuritis, combined fat- and fluid-suppressed SPIR-FLAIR imaging is superior to fat-suppressed SPIR or STIR imaging.

Keyword

Brain, diseases; Brain, MR; Magnetic resonance(MR), pulse sequences

MeSH Terms

Axis, Cervical Vertebra
Diagnosis
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Optic Nerve
Optic Neuritis*
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