Hanyang Med Rev.  2013 Aug;33(3):170-177. 10.7599/hmr.2013.33.3.170.

Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Genetic Polymorphisms and Occurrence Risks

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. kytae@hanyang.ac.kr

Abstract

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), which is the 5th most common cancer worldwide, is believed to be induced by environmental carcinogens and host genetic factors. The main etiologic environmental factors are tobacco, alcohol, viral infection, nutritional deficit, mineral inhalation and history of radiation exposure. Accumulating evidence has shown that genetic polymorphisms influence the risk of environmental carcinogenesis, and that genetic susceptibility plays an important role in the development of HNSCC. Genetic susceptibility to HNSCC may be due to genetic polymorphisms in genes controlling both carcinogen metabolism and repair of DNA damage. We analyzed the associations between genetic polymorphisms in the xenobiotics metabolizing gene, alcohol metabolizing gene and DNA repair genes and the risk of HNSCC in an at-risk Korean population. In conclusion, ADH1B +3170A>G His48Arg and XRCC1 R194W (C>T) polymorphism are associated with an increased risk of HNSCC, and these genotypes could be useful biomarkers for identifying Koreans with a greater risk of HNSCC.

Keyword

Polymorphism, Genetic; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1; DNA Repair

MeSH Terms

Carcinogens, Environmental
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1
DNA Damage
DNA Repair
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Head
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Inhalation
Neck
Polymorphism, Genetic
Tobacco
Xenobiotics
Biomarkers
Carcinogens, Environmental
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1
Xenobiotics

Cited by  1 articles

Role of Experimental Research as a Surgeon
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Hanyang Med Rev. 2013;33(3):139-141.    doi: 10.7599/hmr.2013.33.3.139.


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