Korean J Audiol.  2013 Dec;17(3):124-132. 10.7874/kja.2013.17.3.124.

The Cortical Evoked Response Elicited by Nine Plosives in Normal Hearing Listeners

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Research Institute of Audiology and Speech Pathology, College of Natural Sciences, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.
  • 2Department of Audiology, Hallym University of Graduate Studies, Seoul, Korea. bahng.jh@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
P1-N1-P2 complex reflecting pre-attentive processing of sound presents several temporally overlapping and spatially distributed neural sources in or near primary auditory cortex. This study investigated cortical evoked responses to the P1-N1-P2 complex to determine the perceptual contributions of the acoustic features.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS
Eleven young native-speaking Korean adults with normal hearing participated. The stimuli were three bilabial, three alveolar, and three velar syllables, and each place of articulation had one lax, one tense, and one aspirate syllable as the manner of articulation.
RESULTS
The results indicate the cortical responses to the velar syllables significantly differed from the bilabial and alveolar groups at the P1-N1 and N1-P2 interamplitude. However, there is no significant difference in the cortical responses between Korean lax and tense syllables, which is significant for English phonology in terms of voice onset time. Further, the cortical responses to aspirate syllables significantly differed from two other groups in the interamplitude, demonstrating that the /tha/ syllable had the largest response at N1-P2 interamplitude.
CONCLUSIONS
Different speech sounds evoked different P1-N1-P2 patterns in the place and the manner of articulation in terms of interamplitude, but not of the latency and interlatency although further studies should be followed.

Keyword

Cortical evoked responses; P1-N1-P2 complex; Korean plosives; Speech evoked responses; Speech perception; Auditory cortex

MeSH Terms

Acoustics
Adult
Auditory Cortex
Hearing*
Humans
Phonetics
Speech Perception
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Voice
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