Korean J Pain.  2009 Dec;22(3):253-256. 10.3344/kjp.2009.22.3.253.

Treatment of Compensatory Hyperhidrosis with Botulinum Toxin A: A case report

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. jinwoos@amc.seoul.kr

Abstract

Conventional thoracoscopic sympathectomy is an effective method in treating palmar-axillary hyperhidrosis. However, this may result in a postoperatively compensatory hyperhidrosis. Conservative treatments of compensatory hyperhidrosis consist of aluminum chloride, anticholinergics, iontrophoresis, and botulinum toxin A injections. Surgical treatments in compensatory hyperhidrosis include excision of axillary tissue, liposuction, and thoracoscopic sympathectomy. Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A has used to treat focal axillary or palmar hyperhidrosis. Botulinum toxin A bestows significant benefits with few side-effects and is well-tolerated, with beneficial results lasting from 4-16 months. We report a case illustrating the beneficial use of botulinum toxin A in a 25-year-old healthy male patient with compensatory sweating of the flank after thoracoscopic sympathectomy. Modified Minor's starch iodine test was used to allow accurate assess the impact of hyperhidrosis on the patient. In conclusion, Botulinum toxin type A is a valuable therapy for compensatory sweating after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

Keyword

botulinum toxin A; compensatory hyperhidrosis; Minor's starch iodine test; thoracoscopic sympathectomy

MeSH Terms

Adult
Aluminum
Aluminum Compounds
Botulinum Toxins
Botulinum Toxins, Type A
Chlorides
Cholinergic Antagonists
Humans
Hyperhidrosis
Injections, Intradermal
Iodine
Lipectomy
Male
Starch
Sweat
Sweating
Sympathectomy
Aluminum
Aluminum Compounds
Botulinum Toxins
Botulinum Toxins, Type A
Chlorides
Cholinergic Antagonists
Iodine
Starch
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