Korean J Dermatol.  2000 Jun;38(6):798-801.

Four cases of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome associated with Methazolamide Treatment

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Dermatology, Chonnam University Medical School, Kwangju, Korea.

Abstract

Methazolamide is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor commonly used for lowering intraocular pressure in glaucoma and other ophthalmologic diseases. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are sulfonamide derivatives that are known to cause many adverse side effects, including dermatologic reactions. Recently, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) associated with methazolamide treatment has been reported in Japanese and Japanese Americans, and it suggested a relationship between genetic background and methazolamide-induced SJS. We report four cases of SJS induced by methazolamide. Methazolamide should be prescribed with caution in patients of Japanese or Korean descent.

Keyword

Methazolamide; Stevens-Johnson syndrome; Korean

MeSH Terms

Asian Americans
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors
Carbonic Anhydrases
Glaucoma
Humans
Intraocular Pressure
Methazolamide*
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome*
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors
Carbonic Anhydrases
Methazolamide
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