J Rheum Dis.  2012 Oct;19(5):299-301. 10.4078/jrd.2012.19.5.299.

A Case of Atypical Giant Cell Arteritis Presenting as a Fever of Unknown Origin

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute for Immunology and Immunologic Disease, Seoul, Korea. yongbpark@yuhs.ac
  • 2Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis predominantly found in individuals of Northern European ancestry over 50 years of age. Typically it presents with new-onset persistent headache, claudication of jaws, and existence of an abnormal temporal artery. However, the diagnosis of GCA and the assessment of its activity remain challenging, especially in patients presenting with a variety of non-specific symptoms and laboratory tests. In those cases, 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) is useful for the diagnosis of GCA. Recently, the number of foreign patients who visit domestic hospitals for medical care is increasing in Korea. Here-in, we report a Russian patient who was admitted to our hospital with fever of unknown origin (FUO). FUO study was performed to search for infection or malignancy and GCA was suspected by 18F-FDG-PET. The patient was eventually diagnosed with GCA by random temporal artery biopsy.

Keyword

Giant cell arteritis; Fever of unknown origin; Positron emission tomography

MeSH Terms

Biopsy
Fever
Fever of Unknown Origin
Giant Cell Arteritis
Giant Cells
Headache
Humans
Jaw
Korea
Positron-Emission Tomography
Systemic Vasculitis
Temporal Arteries
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