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Imaging Sci Dent. 2012 Sep;42(3):183-190. English. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.5624/isd.2012.42.3.183
Choi BR , Choi DH , Huh KH , Yi WJ , Heo MS , Choi SC , Bae KH , Lee SS .
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, BK21 Craniomaxillofacial Life Science, and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. raylee@snu.ac.kr
Department of Preventive and Public Health Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of clinical image quality of panoramic radiographs and to analyze the parameters that influence the overall image quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Korean dental clinics were asked to provide three randomly selected panoramic radiographs. An oral and maxillofacial radiology specialist evaluated those images using our self-developed Clinical Image Quality Evaluation Chart. Three evaluators classified the overall image quality of the panoramic radiographs and evaluated the causes of imaging errors. RESULTS: A total of 297 panoramic radiographs were collected from 99 dental hospitals and clinics. The mean of the scores according to the Clinical Image Quality Evaluation Chart was 79.9. In the classification of the overall image quality, 17 images were deemed 'optimal for obtaining diagnostic information,' 153 were 'adequate for diagnosis,' 109 were 'poor but diagnosable,' and nine were 'unrecognizable and too poor for diagnosis'. The results of the analysis of the causes of the errors in all the images are as follows: 139 errors in the positioning, 135 in the processing, 50 from the radiographic unit, and 13 due to anatomic abnormality. CONCLUSION: Panoramic radiographs taken at local dental clinics generally have a normal or higher-level image quality. Principal factors affecting image quality were positioning of the patient and image density, sharpness, and contrast. Therefore, when images are taken, the patient position should be adjusted with great care. Also, standardizing objective criteria of image density, sharpness, and contrast is required to evaluate image quality effectively.

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