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J Korean Soc Radiol. 2013 Jan;68(1):33-41. English. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.3348/jksr.2013.68.1.33
Park AY , Yu JS , Choi SH , Chung JJ , Kim JH , Kim KW .
Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. yjsrad97@yuhs.ac
Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

PURPOSE: This study aimed to compare the degree of gastric food stasis and following body fat changes after laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy (LSTG) versus open subtotal gastrectomy (OSTG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 284 consecutive gastric cancer patients who underwent subtotal gastrectomy (213 LSTG and 71 OSTG), the one-year follow-up CT images were reviewed retrospectively. The characteristics of gastric stasis was divided into 5 degrees (0, no residue; 1, small secretion; 2, poorly-defined amorphous food; 3, well-delineated measurable food; 4, bezoar-like food). The residual food volume was calculated for the patients with degree 3 or 4 gastric stasis. Postoperative visceral, subcutaneous, and total fat changes were measured on CT and were correlated with the residual food volume. RESULTS: The LSTG group showed higher degrees of gastric stasis [degree 3 (LSTG, 15.0%; OSTG, 9.9%), degree 4 (LSTG, 6.5%; OSTG, 2.8%)] (p = 0.072). The mean residual food volume of the LSTG group was larger than that of the OSTG group (13779 cc versus 6295 cc) (p = 0.059). Postoperative abdominal fat change was not significantly different between the 2 groups and was not correlated with the residual food volume. CONCLUSION: LSTG tends to develop gastric stasis more frequently compared with OSTG, but gastric stasis might hardly affect the postoperative body fat status.

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