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Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Mar;29(1):12-19. English. Review. https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2014.29.1.12
Kojima I , Nakagawa Y , Ohtsu Y , Medina A , Nagasawa M .
Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi, Japan. ikojima@gunma-u.ac.jp
Abstract

The sweet taste receptors present in the taste buds are heterodimers comprised of T1R2 and T1R3. This receptor is also expressed in pancreatic beta-cells. When the expression of receptor subunits is determined in beta-cells by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the mRNA expression level of T1R2 is extremely low compared to that of T1R3. In fact, the expression of T1R2 is undetectable at the protein level. Furthermore, knockdown of T1R2 does not affect the effect of sweet molecules, whereas knockdown of T1R3 markedly attenuates the effect of sweet molecules. Consequently, a homodimer of T1R3 functions as a receptor sensing sweet molecules in beta-cells, which we designate as sweet taste-sensing receptors (STSRs). Various sweet molecules activate STSR in beta-cells and augment insulin secretion. With regard to intracellular signals, sweet molecules act on STSRs and increase cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or cyclic AMP (cAMP). Specifically, when an STSR is stimulated by one of four different sweet molecules (sucralose, acesulfame potassium, sodium saccharin, or glycyrrhizin), distinct signaling pathways are activated. Patterns of changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or cAMP induced by these sweet molecules are all different from each other. Hence, sweet molecules activate STSRs by acting as biased agonists.

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