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J Stroke. 2015 Sep;17(3):256-267. English. Review. https://doi.org/10.5853/jos.2015.17.3.256
Lim JS , Kang DW .
Department of Neurology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Neurology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. dwkang@amc.seoul.kr
Abstract

Systems-based approaches to neuroscience, using network analysis and the human connectome, have been adopted by many researchers by virtue of recent progress in neuroimaging and computational technologies. Various neurological disorders have been evaluated from a network perspective, including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and traumatic brain injury. Until now, dynamic processes after stroke and during recovery were investigated through multimodal neuroimaging techniques. Many studies have shown disruptions in structural and functional connectivity, including in large-scale neural networks, in patients with stroke sequela such as motor weakness, aphasia, hemianopia, neglect, and general cognitive dysfunction. A connectome-based approach might shed light on the underlying mechanisms of stroke sequela and the recovery process, and could identify candidates for individualized rehabilitation programs. In this review, we briefly outline the basic concepts of structural and functional connectivity, and the connectome. Then, we explore current evidence regarding how stroke lesions cause changes in connectivity and network architecture parameters. Finally, the clinical implications of perspectives on the connectome are discussed in relation to the cognitive and behavioral sequela of stroke.

Copyright © 2019. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors.