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Osteoporosis. 2013 Aug;11(2):81-88. Korean. Original Article.
Lee JW , Choi MJ .
Graduate School of Education, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea.
Department of Food and Nutrition, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea. choimj@kmu.ac.kr
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to examine associations between nutrient intake, food habit, and bone mineral density in college females. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study evaluated 83 female college students from the city of Daegu. A self-report questionnaire was used to collect data on participants' nutrient intake and food habits. All subjects gave written informed consent. All participants were given instructions, by a dietitian on how to complete the questionnaire on food intake (inclusive of beverages) and food habit record of weekdays. SONOST-2000 (Ultrasonic Bone mineral density Meter, Osteosis, Korea) was used to measure calcaneus bone density. Body composition was determined by using Inbody3.0 (Biospace, Korea) analysis. RESULTS: Results of this study show that the mean age of the participants was 22.78+/-5.37 and the mean T-score of bone mineral density was -0.67+/-0.90. Forty-six percent of evaluated subjects were found to have osteopenia, but none of the subjects had an osteoporosis. The study revealed that the subjects with osteopenia were found to have fewer amounts of carbohydrates, calcium, and iron intake, compared to the ones with normal bone density level. Mean bone mineral density (BMD) was slightly higher in the higher frequency consuming dairy products; however, it did not significantly differ between two groups (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of osteopenia among college female students is high and college female subjects with osteopenia were found to have fewer amounts of calcium intake when compared to the ones with normal bone density level.

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