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Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr. 2012 Sep;15(3):160-165. English. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.5223/pghn.2012.15.3.160
Lee HG , Oh SH , Lee YJ , Kim JS , Choi KH , Cho YA , Kim KM .
Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. kmkim@amc.seoul.kr
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

PURPOSE: To compare the abilities of radionuclide salivagrams (RS) and videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) to diagnose aspiration in children with aspiration pneumonia. METHODS: The records of children who were referred to the Asan Medical Center between April, 2006 and April, 2012 and who underwent both VFSS and RS to evaluate their recurrent aspiration pneumonia were reviewed (n=67). The aspiration positivity rates of the two tests were determined. The agreement between the tests was assessed by using the kappa statistic. RESULTS: VFSS was more frequently positive (n=26, 39%) than RS (n=23, 34%) (p=0.68). In the 11 children who repeat two test, Repeated examination increased positive rate in each tests (n=11), repeated RS (54%, p=1) is more frequent positive than repeated VFSS (46%, p=0.37). If a cumulative positive test had been defined as at least one positive result, the positive rate of two test was 56% (p<0.05). There was a fair agreement between RS and VFSS (kappa=0.26). CONCLUSION: The RS and VFSS positivity rates in children with aspiration pneumonia were similar but there was fair agreement between the two tests. This result suggests that these investigations to demonstrate aspiration are not interchangeable but complementary.

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