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Korean J Hematol. 2011 Dec;46(4):274-278. English. Case Report. https://doi.org/10.5045/kjh.2011.46.4.274
Park MY , Kim JA , Yi SY , Chang SH , Um TH , Lee HR .
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea. leehr@paik.ac.kr
Department of Pathology, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

Splenic infarction is most commonly caused by cardiovascular thromboembolism; however, splenic infarction can also occur in hematologic diseases, including sickle cell disease, hereditary spherocytosis, chronic myeloproliferative disease, leukemia, and lymphoma. Although 10% of splenic infarction is caused by hematologic diseases, it seldom accompanies autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with iron deficiency anemia who presented with pain in the left upper abdominal quadrant, and was diagnosed with AIHA and splenic infarction. Protein C activity and antigen decreased to 44.0% (60-140%) and 42.0% (65-140%), respectively. Laboratory testing confirmed no clinical cause for protein C deficiency, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation, sepsis, hepatic dysfunction, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Protein C deficiency with splenic infarction has been reported in patients with viral infection, hereditary spherocytosis, and leukemia. This is a rare case of splenic infarction and transient protein C deficiency in a patient with AIHA.

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