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Korean J Anesthesiol. 2014 Nov;67(5):299-304. English. Review. https://doi.org/10.4097/kjae.2014.67.5.299
Lee HJ , Yeomans DC .
Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. dcyeomans@stanford.edu
Department of Anesthesia, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
Abstract

Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH.

Copyright © 2019. Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors.