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Korean J Anesthesiol. 2012 Jan;62(1):57-65. English. Original Article.
Lee JR , Lee PB , Choe G , Lee SC , Lee HM , Kim E , Kim YC .
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Anesthesia and Pain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. pain@snu.ac.kr
Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Pyeongchon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The primary site of action of pregabalin, i.e. the alpha-2-delta subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel, is located at the dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Therefore, the epidural administration of pregabalin could have advantages over oral administration. However, the possibility of its neurotoxicity should be excluded before any attempt at epidural administration. We evaluated the neuronal safety of epidurally-administered pregabalin by observing the sensory/motor changes and examining the histopathology of spinal cord in rats. METHODS: Sixty rats of 180-230 g were divided into three groups; 3 mg of pregabalin dissolved in 0.3 ml saline (group P, n = 20), 0.3 ml 40% alcohol (group A, n = 20), or 0.3 ml normal saline (group N, n = 20) was administered epidurally to the rats in each group. Pinch-toe test, motor function evaluation, and histopathologic examination of vacuolation, chromatolysis, meningeal inflammation, and neuritis were performed at the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 21st day after each epidural administration. RESULTS: All rats enrolled in group P, like those in group N, showed neither sensory/motor dysfunction nor any histopathological abnormality over the 3-week observation period. In contrast, in group A, 80% of the rats showed abnormal response to the pinch-toe test and all rats showed decreased motor function during the entire evaluation period. In addition, all histopathologic findings of neurotoxicity were observed exclusively in group A. CONCLUSIONS: The epidurally administered pregabalin (about 15 mg/kg) did not cause any neurotoxic evidence, in terms of both sensory/motor function evaluation and histopathological examination in rats.

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