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J Korean Acad Periodontol. 2001 Sep;31(3):597-610. Korean. In Vitro. https://doi.org/10.5051/jkape.2001.31.3.597
Kim T , Kim JH , Pi SH , Kim EC , You YO , You HK , Shin HS .
Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Korea.
Department of Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Korea.
Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Korea.
Abstract

Normal gingival fibroblasts functioning is fundamental for the maintenance of periodontal connective tissue as well as wound healing. Nicotine have been found to affect DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, which appear to depend on the type of cells. This in vitro study was done to determine the effects of nicotine, a major component of tobacco, on cell proliferation, viability, activity, cell cycle distribution, and expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gingival fibroblasts. Nicotine has been tested for 2 days or 4 days in 5 different concentrations; 0.1 microgram/ml; 1 microgram/ml; 10 microgram/ml; 100 microgram/ml; 1000 microgram/ml. To assess cell proliferation and viability, viable and non-viable cells were counted by hemocytometer; to evaluate cellular activity, MTT assay was employed; to analyze cell cycle distribution, fluorescent propidium iodide-DNA complex were measured using fluorocytometer; to determine the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, western blot analysis was performed. After 2 days and 4 days incubation respectively, at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml - 1000 microgram/ml, nicotine significantly inhibited proliferation comparing to non-supplemented controls. The cell viability was significantly decreased after 2 days and 4 days at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml - 1000 microgram/ml and at 10 microgram/ml - 1000 microgram/ml respectively. After 2 days and 4 days, the cellular activity was significantly decreased at concentrations of 10 microgram/ml - 1000 microgram/ml. Treatment with 100 microgram/ml nicotine for 48 hours caused an increase in the proportion of G1-phase cells (from 46.41% to 53.46%) and a decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 17.80% to 14.27%). The levels of cyclin D1 and CDK 4 proteins in nicotine-treated fibroblasts were lower than that of controls, whereas the levels of p16 and pRB were higher than that of controls. These results suggest that the decrease of cell proliferation and lengthened Gap phases (G1) by nicotine may due to the increased expression of p16 and pRB as well as decreased expression of cyclin D1 and CDK 4 in human gingival fibroblasts.

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