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J Clin Neurol. 2008 Sep;4(3):123-130. English. Original Article. https://doi.org/10.3988/jcn.2008.4.3.123
Jeong SK , Kim DC , Cho YG , Sunwo IN , Kim DS .
Department of Neurology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Korea.
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Korea.
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Korea. dskim@chonbuk.ac.kr
Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: At least 100 Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RYR1) mutations associated with malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD) have been identified, but 2 RYR1 mutations accompanying multiminicore myopathy in an MH and/or CCD family have been reported only rarely. METHODS: Fifty-three members of a large MH family were investigated with clinical, histopathologic, RYR1 mutation, and haplotyping studies. Blood creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin levels were also measured where possible. RESULTS: Sequencing of the entire RYR1 coding region identified a double RYR1 mutation (R2435H and A4295V) in MH/CCD regions 2 and 3. Haplotyping analysis revealed that the two missense heterozygous mutations (c.7304G>A and c.12891C>T) were always present on a common haplotype allele, and were closely cosegregated with histological multiminicores and elevated serum CK. All the subjects with the double mutation showed elevated serum CK and myoglobin, and the obtained muscle biopsy samples showed multiminicore lesions, but only two family members presented a late-onset, slowly progressive myopathy. CONCLUSIONS: We found multiminicore myopathy with clinical and histological variability in a large MH family with an unusual double RYR1 mutation, including a typical CCD-causing known mutant. These results suggest that multiminicore lesions are associated with the presence of more than two mutations in the RYR1 gene.

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