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J Korean Soc Traumatol. 2006 Dec;19(2):143-149. Korean. Original Article.
Han JW , Kim BC , Jung JP , Cho JW , Chung BH , Chung KS , Kang KH .
Department of General Surgery, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea. bckimgs@empal.com
Department of Emergency Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

PURPOSE: This study was done to evaluate the incidence, type of injury, medical consequences, mortality, and prognostic factors associated with stab wounds in patients who visited Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of 40 patients with abdominal stab wounds who visited Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004. RESULTS: 1) The most prevalent age group was patients in their the twenties to fourties (77.5% of all patients), and average age of the patients was 39.3 years. The male-to-female ratio was 2.07:1. 2) The external site of stab wounds was most commonly the periumbilcal area of the abdomen (14 cases, 33.3%). 3) The most commonly injured organs were the liver and the stomach (10 cases each, 16.9%). 4) Operations were performed on all 40 patients, with 9 (22.5%) negative operation findings. 5) Death occurred in 5 cases (12.5%). 6) The trauma indices of the death group were TRISS 51.9%, RTS 3.6 points, and APACHE II 23.0 points. 7) The average transfusion amount of the death group was 13.8 pints CONCLUSION: These data suggest that the transfusion amount and the trauma index of abdominal stab injuries may be statistically significant factors for predicting mortality.

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