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Korean J Community Nutr. 2000 Jul;5(2):243-252. Korean. Original Article.
Lee JH , Lee YS .
Department of Food and Nutrition, DongNam Health College, Suwon, Korea.
Department of Food and Nutrition, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract

This study examined the effects of excess intake of calcium(Ca) and iron(Fe) supplements on iron bioavailability, liver and kidney functions in anemic model rats. Seven-week-old female rats were first fed and Fe-deficient diet for ten weeks, and then fed one of nine experimental diets for an additional eight weeks, containing three levels of Ca, normal (0.5%) or high(1.5%) or excess (2.5%) and three levels of Fe, normal(35ppm) or high(210 ppm) or excess(350ppm). In anemic model rats, serum Fe, total iron binding capacity(TIBC), hemogolin(Hb), hematocrit(Hct) and liver Fe contents were significantly decreased. Apparent Fe absorption significantly increased with increasing dietary Fe levels, and decreased with increasing dietary Ca levels. serum Fe concentration significantly increased in rats fed a high- and excess-Fe diet, and decreased in rats fed a excess-Ca diet. TIBC was decreawed in rats fed a excess-Ca diet, and transferrin saturation(%) increased in rats fed ahigh- and excess-Fe diet. Hb and Hct were decreased in rats fed an excess-Ca diet regardless of dietary Fe levels. Fe and thiobarbituric acid reactin gsubstance(TBARS) Contents of liver significantly increased in rats fed a high- and excess0-Fe diet, and decreased in rats fed a high- and excess-Ca diet. Fe content of the spleen showed similar results. Urinary creatinine and GFR increased in rats fed an excess-Ca diet regardless of dietary Fe levels. GOT, GPT and LDH were not significantly affected by dietary Ca and Fe levels. These results suggest that excess intake of Fe may increase liver Fe deposits and TBARS, and excess intake of Ca may decrease Fe bioavailability and kidney function leading to potential health problems in anemic model rats.

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